Snobbery

I’m a snob.  I freaking admit it – although perhaps not in the traditional sense of the word.  I’m not particularly biased towards the wealthy, or the politically powerful.  If anything, I’m likely to go the other way on that just to be contrary to what I was taught was “correct” as a child.  But there are some things…  I’m going to be elitist as heck about.

 

Now, this may sound like a very silly thing to be “snooty” about, but I’m very picky when it comes to the yarns I knit with.  Natural fibers, if you please.  None of the plasticky, nylon or other polyester nonsense.  I don’t like my hands to be shredded when working on a project and I certainly don’t like the places these types of yarn are made.  Places where children are used as labor, or people are paid less than a dollar a day.  I can’t support that.  Yes, natural fibers, and natural dyes cost the Earth, but the end product is so much nicer, and I don’t feel guilty.

 

I’m particular about manners.  Rude people, they just rub me the wrong way.  It’s not difficult or impossible to be polite; although I’ll concede there are times that it’s not easy.  Please and thank you, may I, or excuse me, those aren’t challenges like trying to learn open heart surgery.  I understand that some people can get a laugh out of being rude – I’ve laughed at some pretty rude things myself.  That doesn’t get a pass to be unpleasant all the time.

 

I have issues with cheap or poorly done tattoos.  I know, it’s absolutely one of the silliest things to be snobbish about, but a crappy tattoo – be it home done or “flash” – drives me out of my tree.  If you want a tattoo, make it personal.  Make it mean something.  Do some research on artists in your area who specialize in the style you like, and make an appointment with them.  Don’t go with option 35 B on a walk in basis.  That’s just tacky.  Cheap tattoos look cheap – if you’re investing in a lifetime commitment, spend your money wisely.

 

This goes back to manners, but treating customer service people or servers is one of the signs of being low on my personal list of attributes.  Just because someone is doing a job that you aren’t/won’t, doesn’t give you the right to be an ass.  This goes double for medical personnel and aides.  Seriously – if you can’t be respectful to the triage nurse or dental hygienist, you’re being a complete jerk.  It takes a lot of work, and nerve, to deal with sick people and not so sick people.  If you’re in a hospital or Urgent Care, and not getting seen this very minute, give thanks.  You’re healthier than someone else.

 

Creepers…  Ugh.  Yes, the ones that are utterly disgusting on social media or in personal spaces, and the ones who have to creep up that quarter of an inch at a stoplight.  Mmm-hmm,  sure, that’s really going to make all the difference in the world as to when you get to where you’re going.  What it’s going to do is bugger your insurance all to hell when the knucklehead behind you plows into your back bumper, and you hit the guy in front of you.  As for the guys (usually) who don’t take “No” for an answer…  I suspect they’re the ones creeping up that precious inch.

 

I am, in all honesty, one of those people who will make a decision about you based on whether or not I see books in your house.  I know, you can download damn near anything onto a phone or tablet, but there’s something elegant about print and paper.  Books are tangible, and that means something to me – more than knowing you read via app.  Maybe it’s because of my escape routes as a child, but I think of books as being friendly, and cozy.  Digital media feels cold to me – for the most part.  (Yes, I see the irony here.)

 

People who will wear dirty or torn clothing, because “they’ve worn worse” or “it doesn’t matter” press my buttons pretty thoroughly.  I’m 100% in favor of having some junky clothes for lawn care or DIY home repairs and crafts, coloring your hair or painting.  That makes perfect sense to me.  But to wear those clothes to work or even on a grocery run?  I see people in their pajamas at the grocery, and I just don’t understand it.  Why would you do that?  It may not be important to you, but for some people, a trip to the store is the highlight of their week.  Show some respect.

 

I don’t mean this one to come out as racist – but if your pants are sagging so badly you need to hold your genitals to keep them from falling off – buy a damn belt.  I know – it’s part of “street culture” – but it looks stupid.  There are billions of creative people out there who can identify themselves without looking like they’ve got a full diaper.  And, I suspect, that if most of those kids knew what this trend meant when it originated in prisons, they might pull those britches up.  Maybe not – maybe they’re all bottoms.

 

Spelling and vocabulary – it’s pretty damned easy to get spelling right when one has the technology we currently have.  Hell, there are any number of words I take a stab at, waiting for that little red squiggle to help me edit things properly.  Vocabulary is easy – there are any number of resources, even watching something on television that is outside your normal viewing preferences.  It’s probably why half my vocabulary seems to come from the UK.  I like those programs.  I can’t say a whole lot about grammar, as I am the abuser of the hyphen.

 

I recognize these things about myself, and accept them.  In some instances, it’s about having standards that I am not willing to back down on.  In others, it’s experience telling me that if this person behaves in a certain way here, they are unlikely to meet my standards there.  I’ll be taking my tea in the morning room, if you’d like to discuss things.

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “Snobbery

  1. Snobbism, well understood, is a form of elegance; and elegance is a form of culture; and culture is a form of beauty; and beauty… (rats! … my thoughts have got stuck in this point… :// What the heck is beauty ?? It’s “important”, but what it is in its essence??)

    Liked by 1 person

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